Sacred Precinct

"San Francisco is 49 square miles surrounded by reality" – Paul Kantner

Category: Western Esotericism

A Higher Calling: 140 New Montgomery

Commissioned in 1924 in order to consolidate several smaller buildings into one main headquarters for the then newly formed Bell System, (now AT&T) the skyscraper at 140 New Montgomery Street in San Francisco, was designed according to the basic architectural principles of a Buddhist temple-monastery.

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450 Sutter – The Temple of Doom

Specifically designed to house dentist offices, Four-Fifty Sutter is alternately referred to by locals as “The Tower of Terror,” “The House of Pain,” Four-Fifty “Suffer” and “The Temple of Doom.”  Many have pondered the meaning of the building’s mystical Mayan symbolism, but their curiosity was never quite satisfied…until now.

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The Story of a Lost Race

In 1897, San Francisco journalist Frona Wait Colburn, published her first work of fiction, “The Dorado,” in which she imagines that the lost race of Atlantis once inhabited San Francisco 11,000 years ago. In her mythical ancient capital city of “Tlamco,” the seven hills of San Francisco were carefully constructed to precisely mark the orbits and diameters of the planets, as well as map out the seven stars of the Pleiades, and align with the three stars of Orion’s belt.

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Built at the Behest of Spirits

The Hayward Building at 400 Montgomery Street was built at the behest, and some say, with the financial backing, of the Spirit World.

The Hayward Building was commissioned by Alvinza Hayward at the request of the spirits, whose previous advice had led him to the richest gold vein in the country. The medium who communicated this information from the Spirit World was given and estimated $80,000 in finders fees. To repay the spirits for their guidance and support, Hayward was asked to use his winnings to build the largest skyscraper in the City of San Francisco.

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